Cuisine

Icelandic cuisine, The cuisine of Iceland, has a long history. Important parts of Icelandic cuisine are lamb, dairy, and fish, due to Iceland's proximity

Cuisine

Icelandic cuisine,
The cuisine of 
Iceland, has a long history. Important parts of Icelandic cuisine are lamb, dairy, and fish, due to Iceland's proximity to the ocean. Popular foods in Iceland include skyr, hangikjöt, (smoked lamb) kleinur, laufabrauð and bollur. 

Þorramatur is a traditional buffet served at midwinter festivals called Þorrablót and containing a selection of traditionally cured meat and fish products served with rúgbrauð (dense dark and sweet rye bread) and brennivín (an Icelandic akvavit). Much of the taste of this traditional country food is determined by the preservation methods used;pickling in fermented whey or brinedrying and smoking.

Modern Icelandic chefs usually place an emphasis on the quality of the available ingredients rather than age-old cooking traditions and methods. Points of pride are the quality of the lamb meat, seafood and (more recently) skyr.

Animal products dominate Icelandic cuisine. Popular taste has developed, however, to become closer to the European norm, and consumption of vegetables has greatly increased in recent decades while consumption of fish has diminished. Fresh lamb meat remains very popular while traditional meat products, such as various types of sausages, have lost a lot of their appeal with younger generations.

We cant talk about Icelandic food without meantion the Hot-dog. When ever you have an opportunity you should go to a Hot-dog stand and ask for "Eina með öllu", - one with everything. It come with 2 different type of onions, fried, crispy ones and a raw onion, different type of sauses and mustard. The sausage itself lay on top of all this in a tasty bread bun. 

Verði þér að góðu! 

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